Fascinating Facts About the Pakistan

Do you know facts about the Pakistan? You'll discover fascinating facts about the Pakistan's culture, history, religion, politics, and many more.

The country has a long history and is home to nearly two billion people, making it the fifth-most-populous nation in the world. Pakistan is located in South Asia and has a population of almost 229 million people. The country is also the second-largest Muslim nation in the world. It is also the 33rd largest country in area, with a total land mass of 881,913 square kilometers.

The country has a long history. It was recognized as a sovereign state on August 14, 1947, and is considered to be one of the world's oldest civilizations. Islam is the national religion of Pakistan, and the country has four provinces. Its capital is Islamabad. The population is highly diverse. The country has many different cultures and religions, and its diverse population reflects this. Although Pakistan is overwhelmingly Muslim, the country has had troubled political stability and has undergone many wars and coups.

Keep on reading to find out more facts about the Pakistan like what makes it unique from other countries and learn about its many cultural traditions. Here are just a few facts you might not know about Pakistan.

Islam is the Foundation Head of all Laws

 

Islam is the Foundation Head of all Laws

 

One of the most well-known facts about the Pakistan is that in its constitution, the country declares that Islam is the foundation head of all laws and that Islam is the state religion. The plight of religious minorities is exacerbated by this assertion. Pakistan was not born as an Islamic state; it was a parliamentary dominion with a secular constitution. Despite this, Islam remains the foundation head of all laws and is the source of much vociferous conflict.

Although Islamic law is now the official state law in Pakistan, tribal customs and the conventional court system remain influenced by the principles of Islamic law. Shariah courts have the power to review any statute to determine its compatibility with Islam and deem it invalid if it violates Islamic teachings. Some courts have made references to Islamic principles in rulings on due process in administrative law, the enforceability of contracts, and environmental regulation.

The Muslim Council of Pakistan, a government body, is a major influence on the law in Pakistan. It makes recommendations to the National and Provincial governments about the direction of the country's laws. The council also advises the President and the Governor of provinces on matters relating to Islam. There are many ways that Islam can influence political laws in Pakistan. It is a fundamental principle of Islamic law.

The first constitution of Pakistan left many minorities disappointed. A religious leader, Maulana Ghulamullah, who later became the Ulema to the President of Pakistan, said that the constitution had "left the Islamic standpoint out". However, the Ulema of the President, speaking in Rawalpindi on 8 March, called for the creation of a new constitution. And this change is welcome news for minorities in Pakistan.

Culture

 

Culture

 

The rich culture of Pakistan has been preserved throughout the country's history. Muslim Afghan and Mughal emperors brought with them many of the same practices. These practices were also brought by Turko-Iranian nomadic peoples. Many of the cultural traditions are still very much alive and are reflected in the clothing worn by women and men. However, modern trends are influencing many aspects of Pakistani culture. Many of the youth and business people wear western clothes, while many traditional practices are being preserved.

Globalization is a process of integrating an economy that enables people to compete with each other and with other nations. The process involves free trade, the flow of capital, and access to cheap foreign labor markets. Many Western countries dominate the economy today. Pakistan has been impacted by globalization in many ways, including its economy and culture. Its affluent population is more exposed to western products, culture, and media. As a result, Pakistani youth have a greater sense of belonging than ever before.

In Pakistan, families take care of the elderly, never-married adults, and the disabled. It also fosters strong family relationships. Most Pakistanis put loyalty to family before other relationships and even business. Pakistanis value trust and knowing their neighbors and relatives. Unlike other cultures, Pakistani families are more private. Women are often prohibited from wearing tight clothing. Men should cover their legs and arms. While many westerners consider Pakistan as a liberal society, many of its citizens are more traditional.

History

 

History

 

It is one of the most well-known facts about the Pakistan throughout history that the country is a rich, complex, and unique nation. The Indus Valley Civilization, which dates back more than 5500 years, and the Far and Middle East cultures that came to settle in the region, have all influenced the nation's development. Islam is a predominant influence on Pakistani history, and its diverse culture is often seen as a uniquely unique Indo-Muslim community. From its birth to the successful fight for independence in 1947, the history of Pakistan explores the diverse cultural, social, and political foundations of modern Pakistan.

This single-volume history of Pakistan is a fascinating and readable read, particularly the introduction, which gives the reader a basic understanding of Pakistan's development. Although there are several chapters written by individual authors, these are mainly descriptive. The book is primarily written by a single author, but there are also chapters by various researchers associated with the editor. Among these are the director of the Centre d'Etudes et de Recherches Internationales and researcher of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique in France. Non-affiliated contributors include Quaid-i-Azam University in Islamabad and the University Institute of Higher International Studies in Geneva.

Politics

 

Politics

 

The recent events in Pakistan have changed the political landscape considerably, largely due to a deterioration in the relations with the United States. While relations between the US and Pakistan have always been strained, the country has developed ties with both Russia and China. This demonstrates the growing rift between the two countries, which compete for influence in various fields including trade and supply chains. China, in turn, has sought to bolster its influence in Pakistan by developing stealth aircraft and hypersonic weapons.

One of the modern facts about the Pakistan is that The PTI phenomenon transformed Pakistan's youth into a vital and accessible voting bloc. The party's leaders have used social media to target youth voters on novel subjects. The parties are characterized by their founders, and internal party politics are governed by core committees and central working committees. The PTI's rapid rise in the NA and all four provincial assemblies saw it emerge as the third-largest party. The PTI's rapid rise in the polls facilitated its ascent to the third position in the NA and the formation of a government in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province.

The military government has ruled Pakistan since October 1999. Musharraf dissolved the parliament and four provincial legislatures, and later on, held a referendum to confirm his position as president for another five-year term. However, this military-driven regime has been criticized for its lack of democracy. It is hoped that Pakistan will return to its original democratic form, but this isn't likely anytime soon. If you're wondering if Pakistan has a representative democracy, we can explain its system in a simple and easy-to-understand manner.

Minority Religions

 

Minority Religions

 

Islamabad union councils claim no authority to deal with Christian marriage registrars, who are usually church officials. Last year, the Pakistani parliament debated a draft law to regulate Christian marriages. The existing regulation dates back to 1872. Members of parliament held consultations with prominent Christian denominations, NGO representatives, government officials, and senior civil servants from various ministries. The proposal to set up a National Commission on Religion and Minorities has been met with mixed reactions from the religious communities.

Another one of the fascinating facts about the Pakistan is that the majority of non-Muslims in Pakistan practice Christianity, which constitutes approximately 1.59% of the population. Protestants and Roman Catholics comprise most of the Christian population. The Christian community first migrated to Pakistan in 1877, when the Anglican Church sent missionaries to convert more Muslims to Christianity. Later, Christianity spread throughout the region and Christians established churches, schools, and colleges. Despite the rise of Islamism in the region, Christians continued to practice their religion in Pakistan, though activities significantly decreased once the Islamic republic came into effect in 1956.

The majority of Sunnis in Pakistan belong to the Hanafiyyah school of Islam, one of the four major Islamic schools and subsects of Islamic jurisprudence. Hanafiyyah is the most liberal and demanding of the four schools. The other two schools, Deoband and Barelwi, are a minority and have sometimes faced violence. Some Ahmadiyya community members in Pakistan are surprised at the tweet by the Human Rights Minister and are unsure whether anti-Ahmadi violence will become the norm.

Art Forms in Pakistan

 

Art Forms in Pakistan

 

Among the other facts about the Pakistan, it is also true that Art in Pakistan has evolved into a variety of distinct and diverse forms. While classical paintings and sculpture have long been a staple of local culture, contemporary artists such as Waseem Ahmed and Khadim Ali have pushed the boundaries of their mediums. In a decade-long stay in the United Kingdom, Parvez developed a language of colorist abstractions that were rich in symbolism. His evocative and explosive forms are a response to existential dilemmas.

Contemporary artists have responded to these issues through site-specific interventions. Instead of creating discrete art objects, site-specific interventions explore social processes and relations. The Awami Art Collective, for instance, has staged projects in public places to criticize sectarianism, while the Tentative Collective has focused on subaltern communities in Karachi. In addition, Zahra Malkani has analyzed large-scale inequality in the city.

One of the most important artists in Pakistan, Sadequain, first rose to prominence in the 1950s in Karachi. He received numerous prestigious government commissions, completing several large-scale murals between 1957 and 1987. The mural at Mangla Dam was based on the poetry of Iqbal and celebrated mankind's progress through labor. In addition to creating stunning murals, Sadequain's work is often regarded as the most important contribution to modern Pakistani art.

Nuclear Weapons

 

Nuclear Weapons

 

While India and Pakistan have made major advances in nuclear weapons technology, they are still far behind the United States and Russia in their arsenal. While India has been sharing nuclear data with Pakistan for years, Pakistan has only been caught once in the act. That was in 1998 when Pakistan conducted a test flight of nuclear devices on two-PAF C-130 Hercules aircraft. As a result, F-16 pilots accompanying the C-130s received orders to shoot down the aircraft outside of Pakistani airspace. While these incidents do not necessarily indicate that Pakistan has a nuclear weapons program, Pakistan has taken many precautions to safeguard its arsenal. It also has state-of-the-art safety systems for its missile warheads.

While US officials recognize Bhutto's sincerity in saying that Pakistan does not have a nuclear weapons program, they are concerned that the country is pursuing such a policy because it fears the nuclear proliferation of its neighbor. US specialists and analysts believe that Pakistan has an ongoing nuclear development and procurement program. Furthermore, there was evidence of a secret nuclear weapons program, despite assurances given by the late President Mohammed Zia ul-Haq. Therefore, certifying that Pakistan is nuclear-free would be impossible. The US would have to cut off its aid if it did not have nuclear weapons.

In 1998, Pakistan's weapons yields were estimated to range from five to twelve kilotons. Higher yields would increase the number of civilian casualties and cause global environmental damage. While Pakistan has not demonstrated that it can deploy high-yield nuclear warheads, it has enough weapons to threaten the entire world. There is no reason to think it is incapable of using such weapons in a conflict. This makes Pakistan's nuclear arsenal one of the most dangerous in the world.

Large Population

 

Large Population

 

One of the well-known facts about the Pakistan is its large population. The number of people living in the country is roughly the same as the population of El Salvador, which is 6.48 million. The biggest problem for Pakistan's population is the lack of employment and recreational opportunities. Most Pakistanis cannot afford to go out and have fun, so most families simply spend their time at home. Consequently, Pakistan has a high rate of divorce, which is the main cause of the high population density in the country.

Some Pakistanis believe that participation in family planning strategies is improper. As such, women in Pakistan are expected to bear as many children as possible during their childbearing years. In Pakistan, about 70 percent of married women don't use birth control, contributing to the growing population. And the lack of family planning is contributing to the large population, which is a serious problem for the country.

The provinces with the highest percentages of OOSC are Balochistan and Sindh. And the provinces with the largest total population have disproportionate numbers of girls. In Balochistan, girls are the majority of OOSC in Nushki and Pishin. While there is no uniform percentage of girls, 13 districts have over 60 percent female populations.

A Diverse Population

 

A Diverse Population

 

The diversity of the country's population is evident in the workforce. Most multinational companies and national organizations employ a diversified workforce. The fast-moving consumer goods industry, tobacco industry, and telecom sectors have significant foreign investors. The country has a diverse population but there are still many areas for improvement in terms of employment practices. Pakistan's laws do not directly protect older workers and many organizations do not invest in training these individuals. However, deep discussions on diversity and inclusion can lead to improved employment practices and facilitate foreign direct investment in Pakistan.

The Pashtuns are a group of people who speak Pashto as their first language. Pashtuns make up 32 million of Pakistan's total population. Despite their diverse ethnic makeup, Pashtuns largely practice Sunni Islam. Ayub Khan, a former president of Pakistan, is Pashtun, also actors Fawad Khan and cricketer Shahid Afridi are Pashtuns

Despite these differences, Pakistan has an extremely diverse ethnic population. In addition to the major ethnic groups, Pakistan is home to smaller groups. Most Punjabis are Muslims, but there are also small Hindu, Sikh, and Christian minorities. Some notable Punjabi-Pakistanis include Nobel laureate Abdus Salam, cricketer Wasim Akram, and economist Mahbub al-Haq. It is not easy to define Pakistan's ethnic makeup without reference to the country's political history, One of the interesting facts about the Pakistan is the diversity of its people which helps make the country a very interesting place to live.

Best Air Forces in the World

 

Best Air Forces in the World

 

One of the well-known facts about the Pakistan is its Air Force, which is one of the best in the world, and they are active in many missions overseas. They participate in humanitarian relief operations, and their fighter pilots wear g-suits that are greenish. Pakistan's Navy also conducts medical training abroad and has deployed Babur missile systems. Their ground forces also have some of the best weapons in the world. The Army's air force is second only to the US Army's.

Despite the country's great military power, it is prone to political instability, and the military has no permanent allies. Historically, Pakistan has been ruled by generals for nearly half its history. But with the 9/11 attacks, the military's rise in prominence drew Pakistan closer to Washington. The army's overthrow of the Taliban regime brought the country closer to the U.S., and the army-ruled government accepted U.S. demands to help the country to defend itself from terrorists.

The PAF was established in 1947, and its air force has evolved over the years. In 1957, Air Marshal Asghar Khan was appointed the first commander-in-chief of the Pakistan Air Force. By 2007, Pakistan's air force had nearly four million pilots. Its air force was the sixth-largest in the world by the number of active troops. Global Firepower ranks the Pakistani military as the 15th best air force in the world.

Despite the fact that Pakistan has become a powerful nation in the world, the United States continues to be the most powerful in the world. The United States remains the world's greatest military power, but the USA retains the top spot due to its technological superiority and economic strength. However, Pakistan has been embroiled in military conflicts with India since its birth, and its air force is one of the best in the world.

Large Mango Industry

 

Large Mango Industry

 

Among the other fascinating facts about the Pakistan, it is also true that mango has become the national fruit of Pakistan. One cup of mango contains 1.4 grams of protein, 2.6 grams of dietary fiber, and important vitamins A, C, E, and K. They're also high in antioxidants and packed with immunity-boosting nutrients. Pakistan also produces a large number of mangoes for export.

In 2003, the Chinese government approved the import of Pakistan's mangoes. It will take until 2019 to export 20 tons of fresh mangos to China. However, the country is also losing a significant amount of fruit during transportation, post-harvest losses, and even from the plantation process itself. Some estimates put the wastage at 35 percent or more, which would equate to around 805,000 tons of fruit every year.

A vast majority of Pakistan's mangoes are intended for export. They are clean, free of damage, and are mostly uniform in weight. While this fruit is available in domestic markets, it is surprisingly expensive, especially considering the high quality of the fruit. In addition, the Pakistan mango industry is still very poorly developed. Many farmers don't care about their orchards and instead sell fruit to contractors.

A recent study found that Pakistan is the world's third-largest mango exporter. Exports will surpass 50,000 tons this year, which is a record high. The country's mangoes are renowned worldwide for their great taste and aroma. A booming industry is a boon to Pakistan's economy. So far, it's a win-win situation for both countries. The government is making progress to ensure a sustainable future for its mango industry.

UNESCO World Heritage Sites

 

UNESCO World Heritage Sites

 

Among the other historical facts about the Pakistan, there are three UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Pakistan: The Mohenjodaro archaeological ruins, the Baha'i temple complex in Gwadar, and the Qutub Minar in Peshawar. The ruins of Mohenjodaro are part of an ancient city from the third millennium BC. The ancient civilizations of the Indus Valley and the Harappan eras inhabited the city, which was abandoned in the 12th century BC. The ruins of Mohenjodaro are a collection of buildings, monuments, and other relics of the Indus Valley, including an acropolis. The ruins of Mohenjodaro are surrounded by high ramparts and embankments and are the most preserved ancient urban ruin in the entire Indus valley.

The six sites in Pakistan have been marked as UNESCO World Heritage Sites by UNESCO. The other two are tentatively listed but are under consideration. The UNESCO mission said that urban encroachment and poor drainage had been the main reasons for the site's inscription on the World Heritage List in 2000. Since then, several monuments have been restored and improved drainage has solved the dampness problems. The UNESCO mission noted that progress had been made in the conservation of the site's external walls and structures. It also emphasized the need for a training institute to develop more skilled technical staff to ensure the protection of these treasures.

Literacy Rate

 

Literacy Rate

 

Education is a major challenge in Pakistan, as there are over 20 million children out of school. Of these, nearly 40 percent are girls. In 2004, the literacy rate in Pakistan was about 96% in the city of Islamabad. The literacy rate among the age groups of 55-64 was about 38%. In the 25-34 age group it was about 57% and in the 15-24 age group it was around 72%. The poor performance of the education sector is due to minimal public investment. Despite the rising education spending at 2.4% of the country's GNP, it is skewed towards higher education. This largely explains the high level of child labor in these regions.

A recent study revealed that literacy rates in rural and urban areas differ widely. The two provinces with the highest literacy rates in Pakistan are Punjab and Sindh. KPK and Balochistan lag behind. There are many reasons for this literacy disparity. In many cases, the problem is due to a lack of infrastructure, poor educational standards, and political opposition. In many cases, these factors are directly linked to each other.

The literacy rate in Pakistan increased from 58 percent in 2013-14 to 60% in 2018-19. While the national average may appear low, this figure does not necessarily indicate that Pakistani society is illiterate. It does, however, point to the fact that education is an important tool for development. In fact, Pakistan's literacy rate is correlated with economic growth and sustainable development. In other words, the more educated a population is, the more likely they are to be able to make rational decisions.

Terrorist Attacks

 

Terrorist Attacks

 

The jihadist groups that operate out of Afghanistan have claimed responsibility for a series of terrorist attacks in Pakistan. Pakistan's government has long blamed LJ for such attacks, but the broader context suggests that it has a different explanation. The Taliban's success in Afghanistan and their recent attacks against the Indian intelligence agency have led to a resurgence of terrorist activities in Pakistan. Terrorists who operate out of Afghanistan are particularly emboldened by the recent developments.

The TTP, or Taliban in Pakistan, has claimed responsibility for at least eleven terrorist attacks in Pakistan during the past two years. These attacks have claimed the lives of over a dozen security personnel, including policemen. This week's attack in Islamabad targeted policemen. If more attacks occur, checkpoints and barricades will be erected. Terrorist attacks in Pakistan have also led to increased violence among the Afghan Taliban.

The country's religious composition is divided, with approximately three-quarters of Muslims being Sunnis. The July 2003 attack on a Shia Mosque killed more than 50 Shiite worshipers. The following month, Maulana Azam Tariq, the leader of the militant Sunni SSP, was gunned down in Islamabad along with four other militants. In March 2004, a Shia procession in Quetta killed 44 people and injured over 150 others. In October 2004, two bombings in Sialkot and Multan killed 72 people.

World's Second Highest Mountain

 

World's Second Highest Mountain

 

Among the other interesting facts about the Pakistan is the second-highest mountain in the world “K2. It is a challenging peak to climb, with wind speeds up to 200 km per hour, temperatures near frostbite levels, and limited oxygen in the lower reaches of the mountain. Because of these hazards, many people never make it down. Other names for K2 include “Mount Godwin-Austen” and “Qogir Feng”. It is 16896 feet high and was named for a British officer who first explored the region.

Climbers often use K2 as a training ground for Mount Everest. The mountain is prone to heavy storms, and there are far fewer K2 climbers than there are Everest climbers. As a result, the number of fatalities on K2 is considerably higher than on Everest. Nonetheless, those who wish to climb it are encouraged to do so. The mountain is a world-renowned climb, and those looking to test their skills should prepare for it.

The second highest mountain in the world, K2 stands at 8,611 meters above sea level. It lies on the China-Pakistan border and is considered one of the world's hardest mountains. The mountain is located in the Karakoram Mountain range, which includes fourteen other peaks. Apart from K2, there are only 14 other mountains higher than 8,000 meters. K2 is a major challenge for mountaineers, but the rewards are worth the effort.

Large Cash Machines

 

Large Cash Machine

 

ATMs have been a necessary part of banking in Pakistan for years but only recently has the government implemented new policies that will increase their use. Pakistan's National Bank, the country's central bank, recently installed solar-powered ATMs in remote regions such as Khunjerab Pass in Northern Pakistan, which borders China's Xinjiang region. The ATMs will be powered only during daytime hours and are specially designed to withstand the sub-zero temperatures found in such remote regions.

If you're going on holiday to Pakistan, bring enough cash with you. Many ATMs accept Visa and MasterCard, but some are less reliable in rural areas. Make sure to have enough cash on hand when you travel and be prepared to exchange it with the local currency if you need to. You can also avoid fees associated with cash transactions at ATMs in Pakistan by using a local card.

The country has a large cash machine, and it is popular among the locals. The ATM is prominently located along the main highway, and CEPEC has recently started at this location. Tourists are also using it to make withdrawals. However, the majority of withdrawals take place by locals. That means that cash is the most convenient way to pay for goods in Pakistan. And if you're traveling on a budget, it's always best to carry cash in your wallet.

Large Earth-Filled Dam

 

Large Earth-Filled Dam

 

The Tarbela Dam is one of the world's largest earth-filled dams, spanning 143 meters above the river bed. It sits on the Indus River in the northwest corner of Pakistan, about 130 km northwest of Islamabad. It was constructed to control flooding and irrigate millions of acres of farmland. Since its completion in 1976, the dam has added hydropower facilities to meet the increasing demand for electricity in Pakistan.

Aside from other facts about the Pakistan, The two largest earth-filled dams in Pakistan are the Warsak hydroelectric power station in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and the Gomal Dam in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas. Both dams are used for hydroelectric power generation, flood control, and irrigation. Those projects have raised billions of dollars in federal aid. The United States Agency for International Development has committed US$26 million toward the construction of the dams.

The Tarbela Dam flooded 135 villages, displacing nearly 96,000 residents. In response to the floods, many families moved to higher valleys. The dam's construction has resulted in a dramatic change in the region's landscape. However, the dam's impact on local life is still far from over. The Pakistani people are not pleased, but they are determined to make the region prosperous again.

Home to 40% of the World's Footballs

 

Home to 40% of the World's Footballs

 

Many people wonder if Pakistan is a soccer powerhouse, but the country is still closely linked to the sport. One of the sports facts about the Pakistan is that the city of Sialkot produces up to 40 percent of all soccer balls in the world. While it didn't make the cut at the last FIFA World Cup in Germany, Pakistan made a major impact in every match. The 2006 FIFA World Cup footballs were hand-stitched in Sialkot, a town in Punjab province known for its surgical instruments and sporting goods. In 2010, soccer balls were made in China, but the country remains a significant player in the soccer ball industry.

In the late 1800s, a local saddle maker in Sialkot fixed a punctured ball for a British sergeant. After that, he went on to order a batch of footballs from the city. Ever since, Sialkot has been the manufacturing center for footballs for the world, producing hundreds of thousands each year. The town also produces soccer balls, volleyballs, cricket bats, hockey sticks, and athletic apparel.


Elly Haidir

10 Blog posts

Comments