Famous Historical Places in Pakistan

These famous historical places in Pakistan are not just for tourists. Rather, they offer you the opportunity to visit many historical sites that are important for the country's heritage.

If you have never visited Pakistan, you must know some of its historical places. Although there are many places worth seeing in Pakistan, this list of famous historical places in Pakistan offers a unique perspective of the rich culture and history of the country. You should definitely try to visit as many of them as possible!

Minar e Pakistan

 

Minar e Pakistan

 

Among the famous historical places in Pakistan, Minar e Pakistan has great significance for the city of Lahore. It was built to commemorate the Lahore Resolution. The design of the Minar was formulated by Nasreddin Murat-Khan. The structure of the Minar is made up of four stages. The outermost stage is eight meters high, while the innermost stage is 0.7 meters. The Minar is surrounded by a park and white marbles.

The construction of Minar e Pakistan began in 1960 and was completed in 1968. It cost approximately 5-7 Lacs to build, and it took eight years to complete. Additional taxes collected from horse racing and cinemas helped finance the project. The Minar is a symbol of Pakistan and a reminder of its independence. You should visit it when in Lahore.

The base of the Minar has ten slabs that are each seven feet long and two feet wide. On these slabs are carved the 99 names of "Allah". Other stones are inscribed with verses from Iqbal and Quaid, the National Anthem, and poetry. There is an elevator to reach the top of the Minar, as well as two viewing platforms. The views from these platforms are worth the trip. But several steps will require you to climb if you have the time.

There is another reason to visit Minar e Pakistan. Besides being a monument to Pakistan, it is also the resting place of the writer of the national anthem. It is an icon of the Pakistan Resolution. The base of the Minar e Pakistan contains the national anthem, Quranic verses, speeches of the Quaid-e-Azam, and the resolution of the independence of Pakistan in both English and Arabic.

The top part of the Minar e Pakistan is shaped like a flower with petals unfolding and revealing the inscriptions. These are the refrains from the Holy Quran, the platitudes of Quaid-e-Azam Muhammad Ali Jinnah, the history of freedom for Muslims, and the 99 names of "Allah". If you are visiting the Minar, try to buy some snacks and drinks to keep you going. If you are on a budget, you can also try some local restaurants around Minar e Pakistan. You can also ask your guide to recommend the best places for you to eat.

Altit Fort

 

Altit Fort

 

The building of Altit Fort was the last effort of the Mirs of Hunza to show their power to the Nagar Valley. This massive fortress has survived various attacks and earthquakes. One of the most amazing features of the fort is the fact that it was built on the edge of a cliff and the construction methods of the time were unheard of. Regardless of the squalid conditions, it is still a stunning sight and a must-see if you're visiting the Hunza Valley.

The fort has been reconstructed to look like it did during the period of the Mughal Empire. The interiors are made from stone and wood and have multiple levels to make the fort seem majestic. The fort is open to the public and visitors pay just $2 to visit. This small price goes towards the upkeep of the fort and its staff. It is a great experience to see the fort and learn about the history of Hunza.

The Fort was used by the ruler of the area until the 1940s. The family who inhabited the Fort lives in a new house nearby. The Fort was also used as a military barracks and was abandoned after the war. In the 1960s, an American aid worker lived in a few rooms of the Fort. The area's natural beauty and the Fort's historical significance make it one of the famous historical places in Pakistan. A must-visit for any traveler to the Northern Areas of Pakistan.

Sheikhupura Fort

 

Sheikhupura Fort

 

Sheikhupura Fort is a historical monument located in the Gujranwala district in Punjab, Pakistan. Built during the reign of the Mughal Emperor Jahangir in 1605, the fort was later used as the administrative center for the district of Gujranwala. After the district was divided in 1918, the fort became the police headquarters of the newly created district. It later became a residence for immigrants from Indian Punjab but was subsequently occupied by encroachers. It was eventually reclaimed in 1967 by the Department of Archaeology and reopened in its former glory.

Another historical site located near the fort is the Hiran Minar, a 17th-century complex that was built to commemorate the king's pet antelope, Mansraj. It is about 30 meters high and ten meters wide at the foot. On its perimeter are 214 holes, said to have been built to hold the heads of expensive cups. Visitors can view the Hiran Minar by taking the M2 Motorway and stopping at Sheikhupura Fort.

This fort is one of the famous historical places in Pakistan. It is the oldest structure in the city of Gujranwala and was built in the Mughal era. It is attributed to Jahangir, but its name comes from the fact that his mother named him “Sheikhubaba”. This city is renowned for its excellent rice and fascinating historical sites. Besides the Hiran Minar, you will be able to find the beautiful lake.

Empress Market

 

Empress Market

 

Empress Market in Karachi is one of the famous historical places in Pakistan. It was once a bustling market, serving as a backbone for the city's economy. Besides being the primary hub for food supply, Empress Market also acted as a community center. There were nut and vegetable vendors, boys who carried their purchases, and pushcart vendors who sold Pakola. These days, however, the market has been a dying business.

Empress Market is an excellent example of British Raj architecture. It features a clock tower with four elegant corners. In 2017 the market underwent a major renovation phase, preserving the historical significance of the building. Though the walls of the market were covered with pollution, the insides of its buildings were well preserved. Its roof was also in danger of collapsing, but it is still a must-see for anyone in Karachi.

Empress Market was built to accommodate a variety of trades, including food, household goods, meat, and spices. The market was a major meeting and transit hub and employed many people. Before the anti-encroachment drive, hundreds of vendors and thousands of stalls worked at Empress Market. A colonial-era building stood in the center, with lanes and stalls radiating outwards.

Mohenjo-Daro

 

Mohenjo-Daro

 

One of the famous historical places in Pakistan is the Mohenjo-Daro archaeological ruins, located on the banks of the Indus River. These ancient ruins date back to three thousand and five hundred years BC. This ancient city was the largest in South Asia, and major excavations were completed in 1965. Visitors flock here from around the world to learn about the civilization's early history. To understand the significance of the site, you need to know a bit more about the history of the area.

The archaeological ruins at Mohenjo-Daro are located within a large complex that is surrounded by a massive wall. Access to the archaeological site is through a large gate, and brick pathways connect the different areas of the site. The ruins also have some other interesting attractions, including a large collection of ancient laws. Walking in Mohenjo-Daro can be tiring, especially during the hot summer months, so make sure you wear appropriate walking shoes and bring water. Wear sunscreen and sunglasses if you plan to stay for a long time.

Taxila

 

Taxila

 

If you are in the mood for a history lesson, you can travel to the ancient city of Taxila, located 22 miles northwest of Rawalpindi. Taxila, the ancient metropolis of northwestern Pakistan, prospered because of its location at the confluence of three major trade routes, including the Silk Road. Although destroyed by the Huns during the fifth century, Taxila's ruins have been designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Located in the Punjab Province, Taxila is among the famous historical places in Pakistan and home to the ruins of four major cities. The ruins of these cities date back to more than a millennium ago when it was the capital city of the Buddhist kingdom of Gandhara. As a result, it has many UNESCO World Heritage sites and is a popular place to study history, philosophy, and art.

Some of the oldest buildings at Taxila include the ruins of neolithic men and Early Harappan people. You can also see several settlements from around 1000 BCE, including the famous Jaulian Stupa. The monastery is a particularly interesting historical site, and it is guarded by the local police round the clock. If you're a Buddhist, you'll find several religious monuments in Taxila.

The ruins are huge, so make sure you wear comfortable shoes. You'll need to plan on spending at least a day or two here. The museum here contains a nice collection of archaeological finds and gives a decent overview of the history of the site. While there aren't many tourist facilities in Taxila, the location is easily accessible by public transportation. This ancient city is situated about 45 minutes from Islamabad.

Rohtas Fort

 

Rohtas Fort

 

One of the most remarkable features of the Rohtas Fort is its melon-shaped battlements. These are a part of the outer wall. The walls of this historic fort are approximately four kilometers long. The walls of this fort vary in thickness and height from area to area, but they range from about ten to eighteen meters in height. The construction of the fort is quite impressive and deserves a visit.

The Rohtas Fort is one of the famous historical places in Pakistan and was inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage List in 1997. It is one of the best examples of Muslim military architecture in Central and South Asia. Its origins date back to the Sur dynasty when Sher Shah Suri ordered the construction of the fort. In 1539, he renamed it to commemorate the nearby Rohtasgarh Fort in Bihar. In this way, the fort was able to defend its people from the Mughals.

In the early sixteenth century, the Rohtas Fort was a major military and administrative center. During this period, it was used mostly as an administrative center, but the fort has survived relatively well and many parts of it are museums. These are some of the main reasons that this fort is on the list of famous historical places in Pakistan.

Begum Shahi Mosque

 

Begum Shahi Mosque

 

The interior of the Begum Shahi Mosque is decorated with intricate fresco and stucco decorations. The mosque features an ablution tank, which sits in the middle of the courtyard and has been restored in parts. The courtyard was originally laid with brick tiles, but today it is paved with modern brick stones. The prayer chamber is oblong, divided into five compartments by deep arched recesses. Its central mihrab is decorated with floral and geometric stucco designs.

Its interior is very unique in Pakistan for its variety and delicacy. The beautiful fresco work on the prayer-chamber facade and medallion encircling the building is a unique feature of the Begum Shahi Mosque. Historic accounts show that the mosque covers an area of approximately 135ft by 127ft. However, the mosque encroaches on private residences and iron wheel shops.

While the Begum Shahi Mosque has survived the centuries, the exterior has been damaged by pollution and encroachments. Its facade is damaged by illegal construction and lack of maintenance. The artwork on the walls has faded over time. It is possible to get a good view of the mosque from the rooftop of the Lahore Fort.

Takht-i-Bahi

 

Takht-i-Bahi

 

Located on a hill with a panoramic view of the region, Takht-i-BahI is a major Buddhist complex that was constructed in the 1st century CE. Its earliest inscriptions refer to the Indo-Parthian king Gondophares. The complex was later expanded to become a huge Buddhist complex. The fortified town of Sahr-i-Bahlol provided support to the complex by regularly transporting food and other supplies to the temple.

In the fifth century CE, the Huns overran Gandhara, destroying the Buddhist sites. The Takht-i-Bahi monastery escaped destruction, thanks to its remote location. The Buddhist monastery remains here, in the upper Mardan province of Pakistan, are some of the oldest and most complete examples of Buddhist architecture. The site is one of the few remaining Buddhist monasteries from the early period of Buddhism.

The Buddhist ruins in Takht-i-Bahli have been preserved by the Federal Department of Archaeology, which has a dedicated budget for their maintenance. There is also a sub-regional office with staff with the necessary skill sets to ensure the preservation of the ruins. Takht-i-Bahi is located in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province of Pakistan. The Provincial Department of Archaeology in Peshawar-KPK has declared Takht-i-Bahi an "Archaeological Reserve".

The Takht-i-BahI monastery is among the famous historical places in Pakistan and an important archaeological site. It contains one of the world's oldest Buddhist relics and is considered one of the finest examples of Buddhist monastic architecture. It was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1980. Its name translates to "well on high ground" or "spring upon a rocky ridge".

Badshahi Mosque

 

Badshahi Mosque

 

In Lahore, visitors can visit the Mughal-era Badshahi Mosque. Located on the western outskirts of the Walled City, the mosque is considered an iconic landmark of the city. Located just west of the Lahore Fort, this mosque is a popular attraction for visitors. Designed by famous architect Ahmed Khan in the sixteenth century, this mosque is a masterpiece of architecture.

The mosque is one of the famous historical places in Pakistan and the most prominent monument in the city of Lahore. The Badshahi Mosque was originally designed to be a reliquary and house to the hair of the "Prophet Mohammed". However, when war broke out with the Sikhs in the 1840s, the British took control of the mosque and used it as a military training facility. After a brief period, the mosque was reclaimed by Muslims.

The entrance to the Badshahi Mosque is particularly magnificent. Its beautiful and intricate carved paneling is reminiscent of Persian architecture. The prayer chamber is exceptionally deep and has seven compartments. Three of these chambers have marble double domes with a central rib. The prayer hall is enormous, with a ceiling and curved border. In fact, it can hold more than 100,000 people.

Nagarparkar Jain Temples

 

Nagarparkar Jain Temples

 

The Nagarparkar Cultural Landscape is a unique cultural landscape that gives insight into Jain civilization and religious architecture in the region. It is one of the famous historical places in Pakistan and the last surviving part of the vibrant maritime trade and commercial community. Its ruins reflect the rich cultural traditions of Jain maritime mercantile society and provide unique insights into the evolution of culture and environmental change. The process of preserving this cultural landscape contributes to a global conversation about religious and environmental conservation.

The town is a cosmopolitan city with a variety of castes, including the Jain. The Jain temples of Nagarparkar are noted for their rich art and sculpture. The town has significant historical significance, with a mosque, Sati and hero stones, and Rajput fortresses and Hindu temples. These temples are well worth a visit.

The Nagarparkar Jain Temples are one of the historical places in Pakistan, a collection of abandoned temples and a mosque. These temples date from the 12th to 15th centuries and boast some of the oldest Jain frescoes in the world. The town was the center of Jainism for several centuries, and its wealthy Jain community built lavish temples. Eventually, the region was a major destination for pilgrims and Sardhara and earned the title of "the most beautiful region."

The main Bazaar Jain temple in Nagarparkar is one of the historical places in Pakistan and an important landmark. Located in the town's main bazaar, this temple is notable for its intricately carved paintings and sculptures. This temple was in use until 1947 when it became part of Pakistan. This site is also home to a mosque influenced by temple architecture. It is located in a transition zone between the marshes and stabilized sand dunes.

Harappa

 

Harappa

 

The archaeological site of Harappa is a world-renowned tourist attraction. It is among the famous historical places in Pakistan and was the gateway to the Indus Valley Civilization. Although Harappa has only a few wells, the city has an extensive central depression, which may have been a public pool. The layout of Harappa's settlement also suggests that the city was surrounded by marshes. In all, there are about eight wells, and one can only guess the quantity of water.

There are two main areas in Harappan city: Upper town and Lower town. The Upper Town has a large square market, whereas the Lower town has a series of smaller villages. The mud-brick perimeter wall is tall, with square and rectangular salient at regular intervals. The south wall of the citadel is marked by a major gateway, which is located in the center of a large curve that extends out into the plain. The wall is nine to eleven meters wide, and the gate opening is only 2.8 meters wide.

A second area is a ruins site. These are found fifty miles east of Toolumba. The Harappa archaeological site is around three miles in circumference and is built of bricks. It is also the site of the Lahore Multan Railway, which was built with bricks from the site. The city was inhabited for at least 7,000 years and was a major trade center for the Ancient Indus Valley Civilization.


Laiba Iqbal

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